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Sunita Berry's Comments

  • Comment on: Caldicott report highlights 'anxiety' and disagreement over record sharing

    Sunita Berry's comment 28-Apr-2013 5:51 pm

    Make it a part of the duty for the NHS to consult widely and publicly when selling the data sets for commercial use. I am, as a citizen, not aware of my data being sold to Dr Foster, but it sure enough has access to all my HES data on a named basis. That data was sold without my consent. I have no objections to my data being used, by commissioners to progress my care and pay for it. But I object strongly to it being sold without my permission.

  • Comment on: EXCLUSIVE: DH could face probe over IT deal

    Sunita Berry's comment 17-Dec-2012 4:27 pm

    I might be being extremely naive, but why not let patients hold their own information digitally, eg. on a mobile platform or in 'the cloud'. They can then give permissions for those who need to see the information, those who need to use it etc on a prioritised basis. You would not then need huge IT infrastructure, or is it too simple??

  • Comment on: NHS services may move to internet

    Sunita Berry's comment 26-Nov-2012 3:06 pm

    Anonymous 1.09. You are assuming that it is patients who cannot use the net or are phobic about its use. You might want to think about the doctors and nurses and their capability!

  • Comment on: We must resist the siren voices to achieve pay reform

    Sunita Berry's comment 4-Oct-2012 1:25 pm

    But the savings are already being siphoned off. The £20bn figure remains the same and has done for two years despite significant sums being taken off by the Treasury. So the idea of reinvestment into the NHS is illusory. And those that call for pay restraint seem not to be able to concede that in fact pay for ordinary people over the last 30 -40 years has hardly increased at all and debt has been the compensatory mechanism for households to off set the miserly attitudes of employers. The corrosive narrative of private wage restraint with extravagant public pay is only the latest a long line of bogey-men stories concocted by governments to divide and rule - to keep elites in place an well funded.

  • Comment on: Tough choices await CCGs hoping to reverse GP referral trend

    Sunita Berry's comment 18-Jul-2012 4:05 pm

    Oh dear. Why the continued obsession with GP referrals without actually ever stitching it together with emergency department attendances and the further down the chain, admissions. At present the financial framework is completely misaligned. If tariff could be adjusted such that higher price was payable for OP attendance/emergency attendance that did not result in a secondary intervention or admission, then maybe the CCGs would be forced to consider primary care clinical skills.

  • Comment on: Sharing responsibility may be uncomfortable work for medics

    Sunita Berry's comment 26-Jun-2012 5:25 pm

    Perfect storm? What perfect storm? Healthcare costs will continue to rise inexorably across the world because death is the only certainty and humans are not particularly sanguine about leaving this world. Given our need to clutch on to our lives and the propensity by medicine to continue to sell snake oil but only in slightly different guises, and that the snake oil has to be visibly sold in expensive surgical or other interventional procedures, then there is not a hope that the public will accept the need for this austerity. More over, Mr Lansley wants to create at 'trillion dollar' healthcare industry that is so vaunted by those who he aspires to and from where he learns his lessons - the US and you can see where the 'growth plan' for England lies. Add to this and the demand for ever narrow regulation/specialism and you have the perfect spending storm. It is a good time to retrain and become a doctor.

  • Comment on: 'In 10 years' time, doctors will require a second opinion from a computer'

    Sunita Berry's comment 27-Apr-2012 1:40 pm

    Ben, it may not be fair to blame a heart surgeon for not setting up an infrastructure programme, but true leader should always raise the voice which articulates the need for measures for populations. Otherwise he is just another interest group/lobbing voice, unconcerned about how the resources garnered through a programme such as his actually take away from the wider population needs. I see that my point is also supported by Suparna Das above. There is a huge emergent cardiovascular tidal wave which will engulf India and we need leaders to lead.

  • Comment on: 'In 10 years' time, doctors will require a second opinion from a computer'

    Sunita Berry's comment 26-Apr-2012 4:13 pm

    Oh amazing!! He is a heart surgeon. So what. What India needs is to have a healthcare system that means that the majority of its population never gets to heart surgery, which offers, as we all know, only marginal mortality benefit and even in India consumes huge amounts of resources. Can we please stop running hagiographies of procedures that offer little real value when the major benefits from interventions such as clean water remain unavailable. Let us concentrate on reducing the childhood mortality and take a page out of the Victorian public health heroes who wrought the large changes resulting in population benefits. And yes, by all means, farm the robotic work to the robots, who should be able to do surgery much better than humans. And as for churning out lots of doctors, what for? If the diagnosis is done by computers.....Or does he mean surgeons?

  • Comment on: Exclusive: East Midlands hires big commercial name to develop commissioning

    Sunita Berry's comment 4-Mar-2012 9:59 pm

    Whilst Vincent Sai may not work for Aetana any more, you Mr Parkes have not answered the question I raise about due diligence. I reiterate, where is the due diligence in any of these deals?

  • Comment on: Exclusive: East Midlands hires big commercial name to develop commissioning

    Sunita Berry's comment 2-Mar-2012 1:25 pm

    And has anyone looked at AETNA's results in the US? Where is the due diligence on all this. If NHS are contracting these institutions, then should we not be looking at their books to find out how successful they are as opposed to their claims to be, especially in the competitive market. My understanding is that some of the largest insurane providers in the US have been really struggling and are seeking new, compensatory markets. The same has happened with Pay Day loans where tightening US regulatory environment has led to companies expanding to the UK market to mop up a poorly regulated environment.

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