By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy & Cookies policy

Sally Gainsbury

Sally Gainsbury

HSJ's news editor

Recent activity

Blog Posts (15)

Sally Gainsbury contributes to:

Comments (15)

  • Comment on: NHS dragged into cross-border care dispute

    Sally Gainsbury's comment 26-Apr-2013 2:10 pm

    The DH impact assessment on the directive, which describes CCGs as less able to provide transparency and equitable decision making, is here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukia/2012/42

  • Comment on: Sally Gainsbury: tariff twister

    Sally Gainsbury's comment 18-Oct-2012 4:14 pm

    The NHS Info Centre's analysis of admitted patient care PbR income for 2010-11 is here: http://www.hesonline.nhs.uk/Ease/servlet/ContentServer?siteID=1937&categoryID=1865 note the DH's consultation proposes that trusts are weighted BEFORE local payment adjustments such as Market Forces Factor

  • Comment on: Sally Gainsbury: tariff twister

    Sally Gainsbury's comment 18-Oct-2012 12:38 pm

    The NHS Info Centre's analysis of admitted patient care PbR income for 2010-11 is here: http://www.hesonline.nhs.uk/Ease/servlet/ContentServer?siteID=1937&categoryID=1865 note the DH's consultation proposes that trusts are weighted BEFORE local payment adjustments such as Market Forces Factor

  • Comment on: Sally Gainsbury: acute hospitals are living in Monitor's 'downside'

    Sally Gainsbury's comment 3-May-2012 12:10 pm

    Sincere apologies – I messed up my emergencies and electives: The 30 percent “two-part tariff” applies to emergency admissions, not electives, as I wrongly stated in the above. In 2009-10 – the first year the two-part tariff applied – such admissions grew by 3 percent. That would imply, if the penalty tariff was applied without discrimination, that acutes would have lost out on some £350m in tariff income in that year alone. Emergency admissions are now falling – down by roughly 2 per cent in 2011-12 compared to 2010-11. That would still put emergency admissions over the 2008-9 level – meaning the two-part tariff should still be inflicting some pain. But the pain should start to reduce, as emergency admissions numbers move closer to the 2008-9 baseline. The extent to which that pain is reduced, however, will depend on how strictly the two-part tariff is applied. What seems likely is that Monitor’s revised assessment of the impact of the various tariff measures is in anticipation of their more strict application. Thanks to the reader who spotted this.

  • Comment on: Sally Gainsbury: PROMs prove McKinsey right - nearly

    Sally Gainsbury's comment 25-Aug-2011 11:23 am

    Hi Piushkumar. I based my guestimate on the length of stay for a patient whose procedure (by definition?) had not gone well on the LoS data published in NHS reference costs and available here (see the TEI tab in the trust cost schedules): http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_123459 For hip and knee ELECTIVEs, the av LoS is between 4 and 16 days (for many procedure types, it is around the 6-8 day mark). Groin hernia and v veins slightly harder to distinguish from the ref costs, but NHS Info Centre tells me the trim point for electives is between 5 and 16 days. Thanks Sally

View all comments

Sign up to get the latest health policy news direct to your inbox

Job of the week

The College of Emergency Medicine

Project Manager

Competitive

Jobs

Interim Workforce Manager

£400 - £450 per day

Project Manager (band 7)

£275 - £300 per day