New health secretary Andrew Lansley has promised a “more integrated public health service” in his first official statement since taking up post.

A wordle of Andrew Lansely's statement

A wordle of Andrew Lansely's statement

Wordle

The word cloud above shows key words used in Andrew Lansley’s statement

In a statement released by the Department of Health this morning, Mr Lansley said: “To improve health and wellbeing, we must offer support, security and services to those in need of personal and social care.

“We must promote good health, stronger locally owned public health strategies and effective screening and prevention of disease,” he said.

Mr Lansley said the coalition government “intend to bring to the NHS the consistent, stable reform, which enables it to deliver improving quality of care to patients”.

He added that with an increase in “real resources comes a real responsibility”. “We will need progressively to be more efficient, to cut the costs of what we do now, to innovate and re-design,” he said.

“This will not happen in a top-down, bureaucratic system. Decisions must be taken with patients, close to patients and with clinical leadership to the fore,” he added.

While stressing the importance of “highly effective management”, he pledged evidence-based quality standards would form the basis of service design.

The statement said the other members of the government’s new ministerial team would be announced shortly.

Mr Lansley had been shadow health secretary since 2003. He replaced Liam Fox, the new defence secretary.

Lansley’s statement in full

“It is an immense privilege to be appointed secretary of state for health in the new government.

“Just as Britain needs strong and stable government, so we intend to bring to the NHS the consistent, stable reform, which enables it to deliver improving quality of care to patients.

“I have met many people working in the NHS and social care; I know they want to focus on patients and to be accountable for the results they achieve.

“I am determined that we will have an NHS in which the patient shares in making decisions, where quality standards are evidence based and form the basis of the design of services and their management, and where the objective is consistent improvement in the outcomes we achieve, so that they are amongst the best in the world.

“To achieve this in the current financial crisis requires leadership and highly effective management. The NHS will be backed with increased real resources but with this comes a real responsibility. We will need progressively to be more efficient, to cut the costs of what we do now, to innovate and re-design, in order to enable us to meet increased demands and to improve quality and outcomes.

“This will not happen in a top-down, bureaucratic system. Decisions must be taken with patients, close to patients and with clinical leadership at the fore.

“If we are to succeed in improving the health service, we must also improve the public health of the nation. We must promote good health, stronger locally owned public health strategies and effective screening and prevention of disease.

“We will create a more integrated public health service at the heart of healthcare policy. To improve health and wellbeing, we must offer support, security and services to those in need of personal and social care.

“There is much to do. If I have learnt one thing over six-and-a-half years as shadow health secretary, it is that in the NHS we have an immense number of talented, committed and capable people, who want to be trusted to get on with the job. It will be my task to enable the NHS to do this, with our shared ambition to achieve the best healthcare service anywhere in the world.” 

The new ministerial team at the Department of Health is to be announced shortly.