'I would like to know how organic food is ever supposed to appeal to any but the well-heeled middle class when a small loaf costs well over a pound and a nectarine a staggering 89 pence'

It is a paradox of modern life. On the one hand we face a public health crisis caused by drinking, smoking and eating too much and not doing enough stuff that is healthy. On the other we have those who strive to be as healthy as can be, exercising whenever possible, eating neither fat nor sugar, drinking only filtered mineral water and the like.

Intertwined with this paradox is the seemingly never-ending argument about what is and is not good to eat, by which I mean good for our health, not nice tasting (the two do not always go hand in hand).

In addition to the carbohydrates good/bad, protein good/bad, fat good/bad debate ever raging in recent years, organic food has stepped into the mix.

Now those who swear by organic food and even a few who do not often claim that it is healthier, while others would argue this is a load of bunkum. Google 'organic food healthier' and the first hit is about research claiming there is now firm evidence that organic food is healthier than conventionally grown grub.

The second hit, from a story from the same year as the first, is the Food Standards Agency saying that it was no safer or more nutritious. So that's much clearer, then.

What is clear to me is that to eat organically you need deep pockets. Being inclined to be as ethical as possible, I started buying organic cotton wool ages ago. No, I don't eat it, but I do have problems finding it as eventually there was no call for it at my local supermarket. So I had to look elsewhere for a supplier, which drove me to the welcoming arms of an organic supermarket.

When visiting said shop I never fail to marvel at the queues. I never fail to be horrified by the prices either. I would like to know how organic food is ever supposed to appeal to any but the well-heeled middle class when a small loaf costs well over a pound and a nectarine (a particularly small nectarine at that) costs a staggering 89 pence.

It also seemed a bit early for nectarines. I would like to know if eating organic is not somehow offset on our own ethical footprint monitors by buying fruit that may be in season on the other side of the world (Argentinian pears at£2.86 a kilo) but have barely formed on the tree here.