The government has tabled 181 amendments to the Health Bill following a review of health secretary Andrew Lansley’s controversial original proposals.

Sixty-three of the amendments have been sent back, or recommitted, to a Commons bill committee for a second set of scrutiny hearings, which are due to begin on Tuesday.

The changes include the role of the regulator Monitor - whose responsibilities had been at the heart of criticism of the previous plans.

The original legislation says: “The main duty of Monitor in exercising its functions is to protect and promote the interests of people who use health care services - (a) by promoting competition where appropriate, and (b) through regulation where necessary.”

The amendments would remove that and change it to: “The main duty of Monitor in exercising its functions is to protect and promote the interests of people who use health care services by promoting provision of health care services which - (a) is economic, efficient and effective, and (b) maintains or improves the quality of the services.”

The amendments would also add elements to Monitor’s role.

The regulator must “exercise its functions with a view to preventing anti-competitive behaviour in the provision of health care services… which is against the interests of people who use such services”.

It must also have “a view to enabling health care services provided for the purposes of the NHS to be provided in an integrated way” where this would improve quality, efficiency, or reduce inequalities of access or outcomes.

Monitor must also have “a view to enabling the provision of health care services provided for the purposes of the NHS to be integrated with the provision of health-related services or social care services” where it believes this would improve quality, efficiency or reduce inequalities.

Shadow health secretary John Healey has called for the re-committal process to be slowed and for the bill committee to be allowed to reexamine all clauses. He said in a statement following the amendments publication: “It is a disgrace for the government to think that patients’ groups, professional groups and experts can properly scrutinise these amendments in just two days [before the committee starts].

“The amendments confirm the quagmire of new quangos, contradictory duties and bureaucratic fudges in [prime minister] David Cameron’s NHS reorganisation.”

Health Bill: government publishes 181 amendments