A business critical briefing from HSJ’s Risk Management conference

Speakers

  • Stuart Emslie, Centre for Corporate Governance and Ethics, Birkbeck, London University, and visiting fellow, Loughborough University Business School
  • Alison Bartholomew, director of risk management, NHS Litigation Authority
  • Paul Downes, assistant director of governance, Salford Royal Foundation Trust
  • Patrick Keady, member, IOSH board of trustees and freelance consultant, Better Outcomes Ltd.
  • Paul Moore, interim director of quality assurance, University Hospital of South Manchester Foundation Trust
  • Phil Storr, director, emergency preparedness, Department of Health
  • Steve Scott, head of health and social care services unit, Health and Safety Executive

Opening remarks from the chair, Alison Bartholomew, director of risk management, NHS Litigation Authority

  • The rising cost to the NHS of clinical claims stands at £13.5bn.
  • A proactive approach to risk management is needed to reduce claims.
  • The NHSLA endorses offering patients an apology when something goes wrong and encourages all staff to consult the recent guidance document.

Developing an integrated approach to risk management, Stuart Emslie, Centre for Corporate Governance and Ethics, Birkbeck, London University and visiting fellow, Loughborough University Business School

Effectively assessing risk to safeguard your organisation and all those within it, Paul Downes, assistant director of governance, Salford Royal Foundation Trust

  • Risk should have a high profile at board level.
  • Executive patient safety walk rounds are recommended.
  • Patients’ stories should go to the board regularly.
  • Adverse incidents and the learning from them should be owned by directors.

Effectively managing risk through responsible monitoring and reporting, Patrick Keady, member, IOSH board of trustees and freelance consultant, Better Outcomes Ltd.

  • It is important that the risks that really matter are identified and action taken.
  • Leaders’ approach to risk management can define an organisation’s safety culture.
  • In the public sector, delegating or delaying decisions and avoiding taking risks are common tactics.
  • Drawing on the seven leadership leverage points described by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, examples were given to explain why voluntary incident reporting is less effective that the global trigger tool approach.

Promoting patient safety through effective risk management and clinical governance, Paul Moore, interim director of quality assurance, University Hospital of South Manchester Foundation Trust

  • Incident reporting systems have reached their peak and there is little to be learned from them. What trusts need to know is whether the care they provide is actually safer. The global trigger tool can help.
  • The economic downturn and the Darzi report have renewed the focus on quality.
  • Effective partnerships with frontline staff, patients, governors and board members are imperative. Commissioning organisations and provider services must work with the hospital to ensure safety and quality.

Integrating workforce health and wellbeing into risk management and occupational health

  • The room was divided in two and one side of the room had to develop a business case for investing in workforce health and wellbeing from a risk management perspective. The other side of the room had to develop a strategy to raise the profile of staff health and wellbeing.
  • The business case suggested that investing in wellbeing would reduce personal injury claims and improve staff productivity.

Securing business continuity in the event of an unexpected emergency or crisis, Phil Storr, director, emergency preparedness, Department of Health

  • The aims of NHS Resilience Project were described.
  • Harvesting data from previous threats and hazards is necessary to allow effective continuity planning.
  • Putting this onto the agenda and getting it embedded is crucial.

Effectively managing risk across partnerships and organisational boundaries to protect all local stakeholders, Steve Scott, head of health and social care services unit, Health and Safety Executive

  • In line with the findings of the Boorman review, at a time when finances are difficult, implementing good risk management and health and safety practices can help save money.

Navigating the commissioner/provider split and its impact on risk management in provider arms, Stuart Emslie, Centre for Corporate Governance and Ethics, Birkbeck, London University and visiting fellow, Loughborough University Business School

Sarada Chunduri-Shoesmith is integrated governance facilitator in NHS Camden’s public health department. 

Risk Management