Given the arrival of a new prime minister and health secretary, most papers offered their advice to Gordon Brown and Alan Johnson.

Given the arrival of a new prime minister and health secretary, most papers offered their advice to Gordon Brown and Alan Johnson.

James LeFanu, The Daily Telegraph's medical diarist, thought Mr Brown should call in 'our most eminent surgeon' Sir Roy Calne, who had that very week written to the paper to say how much better our health service was 20 or 30 years ago. Would that be the glorious days of 18-month waiting lists for a hip replacement?

Eamonn Holmes, in the Sunday People, prescribed more doctors and nurses. 'We want treatment when we really need it and we expect wards to be clean, not bug-ridden.'

Mr Brown apparently agrees on cleanliness. The Observer reported he sees cutting MRSA as key and will ask new health minister/super surgeon Professor Sir Ara Darzi to devise a strategy.

On Saturday the Financial Times reported that Mr Brown's last act as chancellor was a£2bn cut to the English NHS capital expenditure budget. Ex-health minister Andy Burnham's hot rebuttal appeared on Monday - after The Sunday Times and others had turned the story into a 'stealth cut'.

On Monday The Guardian reported Patricia Hewitt's final shot as health secretary. Leaked letters showed she thought the NHS still too 'paternalistic'.

In a sad footnote to HSJ's coverage of bullying experienced by NHS managers (see 'Leaders claim bullies thrive and middle managers are left to fail'), the week saw coverage of the inquest into Morag Shedden Wilson's suicide. The head of dietetics at Wythenshawe Hospital took her life after an Agenda for Change review graded her higher than colleagues, causing resentment. The hospital said it believed she was supported.

But Coroner John Pollard stated: 'When people introduce these rules and systems, perhaps a bit more thought as to what effect they will have on people would be helpful.' Quite.