'As junior doctors struggle to find work The Sunday Times claimed that the Department of Health survey on GP workload would show that family doctors were earning more and working less'

The furore around Modernising Medical Careers resurfaced at the weekend ahead of yesterday's deadline for the annual appointment of junior doctors.

Several national papers claimed the impact of the botched application system is bad news for patients as well as junior doctors.

The Sunday People went so far as to say that hospitals will be short of 2,300 doctors - putting 50,000 patients at risk.

The Daily Mail more modestly said that up to 1,500 doctors training posts remain unfilled, which it claimed has resulted in cancelled operations.

The Daily Telegraph, in conjunction with the junior doctors' campaign group Remedy UK, did a survey in which 90 of the 100 hospitals that responded said they had to cancel operations and 75 admitted they were cancelling out patient clinics due to the shortage.

As junior doctors struggle to find work The Sunday Times claimed that the Department of Health survey on GP workload would show that family doctors were earning more and working less.

The paper said GPs were working '15 per cent fewer hours than in John Major's day'. It added the survey is likely to generate a backlash among nurses, who it claimed were taking up the slack.

The fact that the paper has also highlighted that one third of GPs who earn an average of more than£100,000 a year are working part time is also likely to cause a stir.

GP pay negotiations and the impact of the Medical Training Application Service are likely to be continually examined in the media this summer.