The paper suggested that any 'sentient being' would be so aghast at the details of the Cornwall report that they would immediately want to turn to the sports pages

Mental health is a Cinderella service and care workers are poorly paid and undervalued: this seems to be Fleet Street's conclusion following last week's report uncovering years of abuse at Cornwall Partnership trust.

Fortunately, in its reporting the press has attempted to understand the difficulties faced by care trusts rather than demanding that Something Must Be Done.

But while there was sympathy, possible solutions are rather thin on the ground. The Timespointed the finger at the government's failure to introduce a workable mental health bill along with acute financial pressures on mental health trusts, but there is nothing much there that could be considered part of the solution.

The Independentworried that the very fact that those who work with the mentally ill will only achieve headlines if they are bullies is enough to dissuade many bright young things entering the sector in the first place.

Indeed they may not even want to read about the problems. The paper suggested that any 'sentient being' would be so aghast at the details of the Cornwall report that they would immediately want to turn to the sports pages.

If they were after some light relief, they could have looked no further than the story of a surgeon who sued St Mary's trust in London, after he slipped in a pool of custard. The doctor won£40,000 after claiming his injuries had delayed his promotion to consultant.

After the court hearing, the doctor was asked if he liked custard.

'Not particularly,' he replied.