Reforms to improve the quality and safety of NHS care are not hitting home in GP surgeries, says a report from the National Audit Office.

It says many GPs have not implemented 'clinical governance' systems found elsewhere in the health service.

While the report found that primary care trusts had made substantial progress on safety, this was not true of frontline services, particularly those independent of direct NHS control.

Head of the National Audit Office Sir John Bourn said: 'Good clinical governance is essential if patients and the public are to have greater confidence in the NHS. While primary care trusts have made good progress in getting structures and processes in place, there has been less progress in actually implementing the fundamental components of clinical governance, particularly patient and public involvement.'

Read the report here

Reforms to improve the quality and safety of NHS care are not hitting home in GP surgeries, says a report from the National Audit Office.

It says many GPs have not implemented 'clinical governance' systems found elsewhere in the health service.

While the report found that primary care trusts had made substantial progress on safety, this was not true of frontline services, particularly those independent of direct NHS control.

Head of the National Audit Office Sir John Bourn said: 'Good clinical governance is essential if patients and the public are to have greater confidence in the NHS. While primary care trusts have made good progress in getting structures and processes in place, there has been less progress in actually implementing the fundamental components of clinical governance, particularly patient and public involvement.'

Read the report here