According to David Lock's article ('David Lock on continuing care liability'): 'There is a serious danger that the new single national criteria for NHS continuing care will result in a substantial number of high-cost care packages being transferred from local authorities to the NHS.'

According to David Lock's article ('David Lock on continuing care liability'): 'There is a serious danger that the new single national criteria for NHS continuing care will result in a substantial number of high-cost care packages being transferred from local authorities to the NHS.'

Danger to whom? The NHS presumably. Yet once upon a time, HSJ was called the Health and Social Services Journal and took a less partial stance on such difficult issues. From a carer's perspective - and yes, carers do read the journal and represent the invisible third party in all this conflict - we don't give a tuppence which agency pays for the intensive care needed by vulnerable clients or patients. What we care about is that the person in need, whom we love and cherish, receives sensitive and appropriate care that respects their dignity, autonomy and human rights, while giving recognition to our own expertise and dedication. After 60 years of indecision, it is.time for an end to inter-agency squabbling and for the wider public interest to prevail.

Britain's seven million carers and the millions of people with disabilities across the UK deserve much better than this. The government should lead forcefully and both agencies should bury their differences and start coming up with some sensible solutions such as devolving cash and power to local communities.

Rob Kay is chair of.the advisory committee of Carers National Association Scotland.