The salaries of senior NHS managers are being scrutinised to ensure they provide value for taxpayers’ money.

The plans were contained in chancellor Alistair Darling’s pre-Budget report last Wednesday.

The plans are part of a clampdown on public sector pay that will also force organisations to name every manager earning more than £150,000

The report says the government has commissioned “relevant audit or regulatory bodies” to ensure public organisations have “remuneration policies which maximises value for money for the taxpayer”.

In addition, all organisations subject to ministerial control will have to publish the number of their employees earning more than £50,000.

The plans are part of a clampdown on public sector pay that will also force organisations to name every manager earning more than £150,000 and provide a breakdown of their salary, benefits in kind and bonuses.

However, NHS regulators seemed unaware of the announcement. The Care Quality Commission said it was a matter for Monitor and the Audit Commission.

A Monitor spokesman said “legislation is quite clear” that remuneration of foundation trust executives and board members is a matter for each trust.

Monitor’s code of governance says remuneration should “be sufficient to attract, retain and motivate directors of the quality required” but trusts “should avoid paying more than is necessary”.

The Audit Commission said it had no direct requests from any government department related to announcements in the pre-Budget report.