Adding to what Ken Jarrold has said, I've been through redundancy a couple of times and these are some of the lessons I've learned:

Adding to what Ken Jarroldhas said, I've been through redundancy a couple of times and these are some of the lessons I've learned:

  • Keep remembering that its not you that's been made redundant it's the job.
  • Expend your anger on something inanimate, then move on.
  • If you have a fair idea about which way the wind might blow, start making contingency plans eg: learn to sell yourself; get advice about your CV; update your list of contacts; and practice your interview technique.
  • If the blow falls, don't sulk. The longer you hide away, the more difficult it is to get another job.
  • Network for all you're worth. Talk to everyone you can think of. Ask for help and the names of other people who could help. It's the best way to get another job. The stigma of redundancy has gone. Everyone knows someone who's been through the mill, so they'll be sympathetic and most people do like to help.
  • Having said that, don't wait for people to ring or e-mail you back - many of them won't. Set a date for following up each enquiry or application. You need to stay in control.
  • Set up and complete a daily job hunting task list starting at 9am. If you're job hunting from home, TV and the washing up can seem preferable to making another round of telephone calls.
  • Ask for feedback on all interviews, plus information on future opportunities.
  • Set up or join a network of people in the same boat to exchange ideas, sympathise and cheer each other up.

Mike Swift, informatics business manager, Wolverhampton City PCT.