There are some people who you cannot imagine using a nickname. I used to date a man whose first name you would no sooner shorten than suggest he ditch wine and earnest films in favour of bitter and rugby league.

There are some people who you cannot imagine using a nickname. I used to date a man whose first name you would no sooner shorten than suggest he ditch wine and earnest films in favour of bitter and rugby league.

Then there are those who strive to reject the formalities of the name their parents gave them, for example Tony Blair and Tony Benn - otherwise known as Anthony Charles Lynton Blair and Anthony Neil Wedgwood Benn.

I was musing on this while checking I had the correct details for some of the new trusts that have formed from mergers earlier this year. As HSJ's resident mental health writer, I had to first work out what the mental health trusts were, as these noble organisations employ a large and dazzling variety of titles.

Some, bold as brass, put mental health in the title, while others variously use healthcare, care, health services or partnership (so as not to forget our social care chums).

Or they stick to the name of their area, or even a historical link to keep things interesting. I have always meant to ask what the meaning is behind the moniker of Kent-based Oxleas trust.

But this does not always make them easy to locate. Berkshire Healthcare, for instance, has the ring of a private healthcare group to it, or is that just my ignorance in assuming all the home counties are rather posh?

There are also the trusts - try as their branding campaigns might - that are never going to be known by anything other than an affectionate nickname. Is there anyone who calls Royal Liverpool Children's trust anything other than Alder Hey? And is Addenbrooke's not slightly easier to say than Cambridge University Hospitals foundation trust? At least they have a kind of brand loyalty.

In my experience, many hospital staff are more likely to answer the phone saying 'hello, hospital' than go into the details of what their trust is called. I used to think this was rather odd, as trusts have been with us for a while now. But then the little branch of the mighty Emap to which HSJbelongs recently got reshuffled and turned into something else.

Save for the ladies on reception saying something different to callers, I am not sure any of us have noticed it.