'Researchers have found that the 29 primary care trusts in surplus in 2004-05 were mainly in inner-city areas'

While The Guardianwas highlighting cuts in deprived urban districts this week, the Sunday Telegraphwas more interested in problems in rural areas.

'Money needed for patients in rural England is being diverted to inner-city areas where it is not even being spent,' reported the latter.

The evidence comes from the Cambridge University medical school, where researchers have found that the 29 primary care trusts in surplus in 2004-05 were mainly in inner-city areas.

But the 29 most in-debt PCTs were in rural areas - and they received on average£205 less per head.

It all backed up calls from the Institute of Rural Health for a 'rurality' index to take into account the extra cost of providing healthcare in rural areas. They argued that the government's funding calculations gave too much weight to poor areas in the cities.

A day later The Guardiancomes up with evidence to show that actually the poorest areas might not be doing as well as the Sunday Telegraph's report might indicate.

A leaked letter from David Nicholson in his capacity as chief executive of London's strategic health authority informs PCTs in east London - the poorest part of the capital - that they will have to bear the brunt of future spending cuts.

Tower Hamlets will lose£2.4m, while Barking and Dagenham will have to hand back£6.7m - 2.8 per cent of its budget on top of a 3 per cent top-slice. One PCT chief executive told The Guardianthat some programmes would have to be put back.