Plans for a shake-up of children's and maternity services in Manchester are under fire because one corner of the city could be left without inpatient services.

Plans for a shake-up of children's and maternity services in Manchester are under fire because one corner of the city could be left without inpatient services.

Two primary care trusts in north-east Manchester are calling for an option to be devised which would keep inpatient paediatrics, obstetrics and neonatal care in the area. Fairfield General Hospital in Bury is the preferred setting.

NHS organisations in Greater Manchester has just finished consulting on proposals which would leave the communities above the M60/62 motorway without inpatient maternity and children's services. The proposals would reduce the number of sites offering it from 13 to seven or eight. None of the options put forward would retain services at either Fairfield or Rochdale Infirmary.

Now the PCTs have called for other options to be considered. Bury PCT chair Hilda Harvey said: 'The PCT has concluded that a new and better option should be formulated to meet the needs of the north-east sector of Greater Manchester.'

Heywood and Middleton PCT has called for more work to be done on locating services in the north-east sector. Pennine Acute Hospitals trust, which runs services at Fairfield and Rochdale, has also said the debate would have been 'enhanced' if an option keeping services at Fairfield had been included.

There has also been pressure from Eastern Cheshire PCT to adopt the one option that retains 24-hour maternity and children's cover at Macclesfield. A decision on which hospitals will retain services will be made in the autumn by a joint committee of the 17 PCTs involved.

Greater Manchester SHA project director for consultation John Williams said the joint committee could adopt other options not originally suggested without having to go out to consultation again.

A separate consultation has looked at where acute services should be provided in the north-east sector. The preferred option would see Rochdale become a locality hospital. Pennine Acute Hospitals trust would concentrate its acute services at its other three sites ? Fairfield, Oldham and North Manchester.

Pennine Acute Hospitals trust director of strategic planning Tom Wilders said the solutions from both sets of consultations needed to be compatible.

The trust is already facing an in-year deficit of£21.3m and has an underlying recurrent deficit of£28.3m. It expects to lose 800 posts. But Mr Wilder said the ability to provide sustainable and quality services was the motivator for change, rather than cash savings.