August sees a drop in confidence over the target to halt the rise in childhood obesity, according to the latest Barometer of public health directors, with June’s figure of 3.25 dipping to 2.91 out of 10.

August sees a drop in confidence over the target to halt the rise in childhood obesity, according to the latest Barometer of public health directors, with June’s figure of 3.25 dipping to 2.91 out of 10.

Optimism over the alcohol dependency target has also suffered and stands at 3.63 out of 10, down from 3.91. Confidence in the local development plan inequalities target continues to edge up, from 4.70 to 4.78. As a bonus question, we asked how confident they are that government policy will reduce alcohol-related harm: 80 per cent reported low confidence.

The public health Barometer is based on an anonymous survey of 90 PCT public health directors and is run with the Association of Public Health Observatories. If you are a public health director and want to join the panel, e-mail rebecca.allmark@emap.com

Confidence scores out of 10

  • 48-hour access to GUM clinic target 2008: jump on June 8.16

  • Smoking cessation target 2007-08: slight dip 6.17

  • Drug treatment target 2007-08: down on June 6.95

  • Alcohol dependency reduction target 2007-08: 3.63

  • Public health funding 2007-08: rise continues 5.83

  • Halt rise in childhood obesity by 2010: small dip 2.91

  • Local development plan inequalities target 2008: 4.78

  • Reduce teenage pregnancy by 50 per cent by 2010: 3.95

National Targets

  • Childhood obesity: 2.91

  • Cancer: 6.54

  • Teenage pregnancy: 3.95

  • CHD mortality: 8.33

Local targets

  • GUM clinic access: 8.16

  • Smoking cessation: 6.17

  • Drug treatment: 6.95

  • Alcohol dependency: 3.63

Alcohol-related deaths in theUKcountries

Deaths directly caused by alcohol consumption, usually excessive and long term, have increased since 1991 for both men and women in all countries of the UK. Rates for men have approximately doubled in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In Scotland they have risen faster, by half as much again. For women, rates have increased by around three-fifths, except for Scotland, where they have nearly doubled.

Scotland started the 1990s with the highest alcohol-related mortality of the UK countries and the gap increased substantially for a decade into the early 2000s.

A report for the English regions is due to be launched in late Summer 2007, see www.apho.org.uk