Some turnaround teams sent in to trusts could be there for up to two years, the head of the NHS has admitted to MPs.

Some turnaround teams sent in to trusts could be there for up to two years, the head of the NHS has admitted to MPs.

Giving evidence to the Commons health select committee on NHS expenditure in 2005-06, NHS chief executive David Nicholson said that the length of time turnaround teams stayed in trusts would depend on the scale of the problems.

'Some of the issues are very complicated and very difficult and some organisations need the extra skills of the turnaround teams to tackle these problems,' Mr Nicholson said on Thursday.

'There are plans for some turnaround teams to be in place for six to eight months and some will be there for two years.

'There is good evidence that turnaround teams are working and most of the problems can be solved by good management and good leadership.'

Labour MP Ronnie Campbell argued: 'The Department of Health must have very little faith in its own management if teams have to be sent into a third of trusts.'

And health committee chair Kevin Barron MP said that there was a lack of detailed information available on how the money for non-NHS providers was spent.

NHS director of finance Richard Douglas said that the information available was what was required for NHS accounting purposes, but that if the committee recommended it the DoH would try to provide more detailed data on non-NHS spending.

On the NHS IT programme, Mr Taylor said the DoH would 'try to reconcile' the National Audit Office forecast of£13bn costs with the DoH's recent estimate of£7bn and provide a note to the committee.

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