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Health Service Journal
21 February 2008

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  • Accounting change could strain PFI

    The Department of Health has refused to say whether or not it has set aside any resources to help trusts cope with a major change to private finance initiative schemes later this year.
  • Act now to avoid crisis, says RCN

    The Department of Health must recognise the need to train thousands more nurses now to meet 'unprecedented' demand by 2030, the Royal College of Nursing has warned.
  • All Our Yesterdays

    February 20, 1948, Public Assistance Journal and Health & Hospital Review A letter issued on behalf of ten trade unions and organisations states that they have learned that moves are being made to launch a new organisation…The National Federation of Hospital Officers. The majority of hospital officers (states the letter) are already attached to one or other of these long established organisations, all of which can adequately cater for their
  • Ambulance services deny claims of patient stacking

    Ambulance services and the Department of Health have hit back at claims that patients are being deliberately detained in ambulances to ensure hospitals hit accident and emergency waiting-time targets.
  • Basic data 'should be free'

    The chief executive of the Information Centre has promised to 'put right' the perception that Dr Foster has Intelligence unfair access to NHS data.
  • BMA will fight

    It is not the BMA which is 'grossly misrepresenting' the argument over GP opening hours. It is the government's campaign of misinformation, inaccurate media reporting and misleading articles s
  • Cardiac target to cut deaths met early

    The NHS has made 'outstanding progress' in managing cardio- vascular disease, according to two reports published this week.
  • Career changes will turn nurses into 'handmaidens', say unions

    Nurses will become mere “handmaidens” who lack leadership skills under planned changes to nursing careers, unions have warned. The Department of Health’s consultation on post-registration
  • Career Path: rising to the top

    Dr Simon Eccles talks to Stuart Shepherd about his path from medical school to a variety of roles in NHS management
  • Career Path: rising to the top

    Dr Simon Eccles talks to Stuart Shepherd about his path from medical school to a variety of roles in NHS management
  • Clean record

    Media Watch reported that according to the Mail on Sunday, NHS North East spent £150,000 on cardboard nurses.
  • coaching

    Paul GanderAs with so many management ideas favoured by the private sector, coaching has been given a warm reception in many parts of the NHS.Coaching associate at the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sue Mortlock explains some of the changes that have taken place. “Many years ago, it was perceived as a remedial measure. But now, in the private sector, you haven’t really arrived as a company director until you have your own coach.”In today’s health service, co
  • Commissioning begins at home

    The Teenage Cancer Trust has blazed a trail for charities by investing in commissioning. Sue McLellen and Simon Davies explain
  • Councils given chance to offload burdens

    An independent review body has launched an investigation into the factors that hinder partnership work between health and social care services.
  • David Lammy

    John Rogers, chief executive of Skills for Health – the Sector Skills Council for the NHS, independent and voluntary healthcare sectors - interviews David Lammy, Minister for Skills and former Under-Secretary of State for Health. JR: In your current role as Minister for Skills - and in view of your prior experience as Under-Secretary of State for Health – during your lifetime, how do you think skills needs have changed in the healthcare sector?DL: In k
  • Device offers peace of mind for lone healthcare workers

    Lone workers at Guy's and St Thomas' foundation trust are using a new security device that allows them to communicate discreetly with a back-up call centre in potentially hazardous situations.
  • Device offers peace of mind for lone healthcare workers

    Lone workers at Guy's and St Thomas' foundation trust are using a new security device that allows them to communicate discreetly with a back-up call centre in potentially hazardous situations.
  • Doctors move to vote yes, under protest

    GPs will be persuaded to vote yes to the government's offer on extended hours, according to a poll of GPs.
  • Emma Dent on the common cold

    I have a new hobby: blowing my nose. Not the most riveting of pastimes but my hope is that framing said activity in this way will make it seem less like a chore and more of a fun way to pass the time.
  • Failure to assess

    Congratulations for highlighting out-of-area assessments for mental healthcare. This problem is not confined to people needing to be sectioned under the Mental Health Act, writes Linda Davidson
  • Franklin Oikelome and Ronny Flynn on the NHS equality record

    The NHS is the largest single employer in the UK, employing over a million people. Since its inception, it has relied on a workforce with a high proportion of black and minority ethnic staff, many of whom were actively recruited in the 1950s and 1960s to pioneer the new health service after the Second World War. This has been an asset to an NHS which over 60 years has served an increasingly diverse population: around 10 per cent of the UK population is now from a BME group.
  • GPs must see sense on hours

    New proposals for extended working hours for GPs have provoked a storm of protest - but doctors should take a careful look at the benefits, argues Alastair Henderson
  • Health screening: from talk to action

    The importance of preventive diagnosis and screening programmes are now being talked up by the prime minister himself. Joshua Rowe looks at how they are already saving money - and lives
  • Health screening: from talk to action

    Preventive diagnosis and screening programmes can improve patient care and save the NHS money, writes Joshua Rowe
  • Hospitals gain ground in acute services battle

    Three West Sussex hospitals have moved a step closer to retaining many of their acute services.
  • HSJ supplement: Learning curves

    For subscribers only: This supplement discusses different aspects of training the workforce for 2020.Subscribe now to access the supplement!
  • In the line of fire

    Joining the Territorial Army develops skills such as leadership, communication, initiative and resource control. That’s why the service has much to teach managers, says Paul Gander
  • Information Centre dental report

    The Information Centre for health and social care's latest report on dental statistics for England revealed that just over 70 per cent of all children aged 17 or under had visited an NHS dentist in the last two years.
  • Information Centre dental report

    The Information Centre for health and social care's latest report on dental statistics for England revealed that just over 70 per cent of all children aged 17 or under had visited an NHS dentist in the last two years.
  • Is government taking liberties with the foundation principle?

    The argument between the foundation trust lobby and the Department of Health over foundations’ freedoms goes to the heart of the debate about the role of politics in health policy.
  • Is it reasonable to audit GPs' hours?

    Far from 'standing between patients and a better service' over longer GP opening hours, the British Medical Association has said most GPs would offer appointments in extended hours, writes Ric
  • It’s all about the individual

    This HSJ Award-winning training and quality development programme for educators teaches a thoroughly patient-centred approach. Stuart Shepherd is keen to learn more
  • Jo Stephenson on patient stacking

    Patient stacking sounds like the kind of thing medical students might get up to: giant Jenga with people instead of blocks of wood.
  • Johnson irks committee as he ducks careers queries

    Health secretary Alan Johnson has rankled MPs by refusing to answer questions at a health select committee inquiry into Modernising Medical Careers.Mr Johnson batted off a series of questions about junior doctors' training, saying he could not comment before the Department of Health's formal response to the Tooke report.
  • Jon Restell on looking after managers

    Managers in healthcare need to do more than ever to look after their staff. I don't have a problem with this; it's the right thing to be doing.
  • Kidney disease: detection is better

    Chronic kidney disease is an underdiagnosed but increasingly common condition. Estimates suggest 4-9 per cent of adults experience the more advanced stages of the disease. The burden on the health service is growing, and 1-2 per cent of the NHS budget is now spent on dialysis alone, say David Meechan and James Hollinshead
  • KSF – the challenges ahead

    Affecting around 1 million NHS staff on Agenda for Change terms and conditions, the Knowledge and Skills Framework is now helping many NHS trusts to achieve their workforce priorities. It supports them in re-designing their services, as well as in developing and retaining their workforce and engaging with their staff. In addition, the KSF enables employers to link the work their organisation does with the skills and competencies of their staff. By ensuring staff are competent, the KSF provide
  • Learning curves

    HSJ's L&D supplement discusses different aspects of training the workforce for 2020.
  • Maggie Rae on Premier League performance

    Do names matter? Since arriving back in the NHS and PCT land, I haven't had much chance to think about titles or the name of our organisation.
  • Michael White on the consultant of the future

    I make it a policy to chuckle when I hear of some mild British institution being likened to Nazi Germany or Stalin's Russia by someone who hasn't understood much history. Even law lords do it.
  • minimum gp core hours

    The Department of Health has no plans to set a minimum number of consulting hours GP practices should provide during their contracted core hours. As the government plans to set a minimum threshold for hours practices must be available
  • Ministers press for more child palliative care

    Ministers have made it clear they expect primary care trusts to spend more on children's palliative care.
  • Ministers vs GPs: how did it come to this?

    The GP contract talks have been played out for the public, with both sides taking to the airwaves. Ingrid Torjesen explores why a couple of extra hours a week has created such a conflict
  • Monitor challenges DH on freedoms

    Battle lines are hardening between foundation trusts and the Department of Health over the trusts' future, following a series of leaked letters between the leaders of the NHS and regulator Monitor, reports Sally Gainsbury. The correspondence has exposed a gulf between their positions on New Labour's flagship hospitals.
  • Neil Goodwin on building working relationships

    What do teenage children, marriage and friendships have in common when thinking about work? They all offer excellent opportunities for developing relationship skills in the workplace.
  • Neil Goodwin on building working relationships

    What do teenage children, marriage and friendships have in common when thinking about work? They all offer excellent opportunities for developing relationship skills in the workplace.
  • Out of the picture

    The NHS is still dragging its feet on race equality, especially in top posts. So will the relaunched Breaking Through programme kick-start the revolution, asks Caroline White
  • PCTs 'would gain power by a constitution'

    An NHS constitution would address the 'woefully inadequate' relationship between commissioners and patients, shadow health secretary Andrew Lansley has claimed.
  • Perfect match

    The training of more junior staff has been neglected in the past. But an initiative that provides match-funding for investment in their skills is a big boost for those in bands 1-4, reports Stuart Shepherd
  • Primary care leaders call GP resistance 'unhelpful'

    Primary care leaders have joined the argument over extended hours after GPs warned they may refuse to take part in local audits on opening times.
  • Private sector deals face audit office scrutiny

    The National Audit Office is to investigate the Department of Health's decision to cancel a large swathe of its independent sector treatment centre programme.
  • Proud of our A&E

    I was pleased Emma Dent had a positive experience in accident and emergency, but she did not name the trust. So, on Emma's behalf, I just wanted to thank the hard-working staff who treated her colleague at UCLH.
  • Ronny Flynn on righting racial inequalities

    Frontline staff and managers' skills in engaging with and using evidence are essential to promoting race equality in health services. Britain prides itself on its open access to healthcare and the quality of its prevention and treatment of illness.
  • self-certification reviews

    Foundation trusts must accurately "self-certify" on all healthcare targets under a system which allows them to monitor their own performance or risk "significant financial and regulatory penalites", Monitor has warned.In December the regulator decided to scrutinise 11 foundation trusts which had failed to hit performance targets they had claim
  • Six of the best

    Six national demonstrator sites are leading the way in using a powerful new set of tools from Skills for Health to redesign jobs and services, says Stuart Shepherd
  • Steve Onyett on a network with attitude

    Junior health minister Lord Darzi’s interim report on the future of the NHS highlights the importance of effective leadership and stable contexts for service improvement. It would be tragic if we missed this historic opportunity to make the best use of our current understanding of leadership and leadership development.A recent HSJ survey understandably focused on middle management as the crucial interface between senior management and clinicians. That is often where
  • Steve Onyett on Paxman's pants

    While "pants" is a term of derision in the vernacular of youth, Jeremy Paxman's exchange last month with Marks & Spencer chief executive Sir Stuart Rose has done the men of our nation a service by highlighting the importance of being supported in all the right places.This is not the only way in which appropriate support in the right places is important, especially at work. Consider the behaviour of our leaders and managers in relation to key outcomes for staff, such as mor
  • Take part in an Information Centre survey

    People involved in health and social care information - from managers and commissioners to public health researchers and academics - are invited to help shape a major new population-based survey as part of a wider survey programme being developed by the Information Centre for health and social care.
  • Take part in an Information Centre survey

    People involved in health and social care information - from managers and commissioners to public health researchers and academics - are invited to help shape a major new population-based survey as part of a wider survey programme being developed by the Information Centre for health and social care.
  • The role of the Information Centre for health and social care

    The need for high-quality, timely information is greater than ever in the health service, as Information Centre chief executive Tim Straughan explains
  • The role of the Information Centre for health and social care

    The need for high-quality, timely information is greater than ever in the health service, as Information Centre chief executive Tim Straughan explains
  • This week's lookey likey

    Reader Peter Munday of Mersey Care trust writes: 'Before he (Rhydian that is), fades into obscurity, I feel I have to point out the astounding similarity between Rhydian Roberts of runner up in TV talent show X-Factor fame and David Dalton, the chief executive of Salford Royal foundation trust.'We agree with Peter but see our before and after shots - we think the similarity is greater before the war
  • Trust plans to scrap jobs and shelve units

    Trafford Healthcare trust has launched a turnaround plan in a bid to avoid a £7m deficit next year.
  • Try the human touch

    Paula Hyde and Ruth Boaden look at how HR managers have an increasingly important role in boosting performance
  • Unions warn nurses will be jack of all trades

    Nurses will become mere 'handmaidens' who lack leadership skills under planned changes to nursing careers, unions have warned.
  • Using evidence to achieve equality in healthcare

    Frontline staff and managers must be skilled in engaging with and using evidence if they are to promote race equality in health services, writes Ronny Flynn
  • Using evidence to achieve equality in healthcare

    Frontline staff and managers must be skilled in engaging with and using evidence if they are to promote race equality in health services, writes Ronny Flynn
  • Where NICE leads, can commissioners follow?

    There is still a chasm between the process of writing recommendations and the people responsible for commissioning the services to deliver them. Can world class commissioning bring these closer together, asks Martin Dougherty
  • Who cares for the carers?

    People caring for a relative are a vital part of the health and social care system - but many feel isolated. A national strategy aims to help by making GPs and community services more carer friendly. Stuart Shepherd reports

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