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Health Service Journal
1998-11-12

View all stories from this issue.

  • A life in the theatre: survey results

    All but one of the trusts identified current nursing and operating department assistant staff vacancies in their theatres. The number of vacancies reported ranged from four to 26 - equivalent to 10 per cent overall.
  • Agencies should not pay for the working time directive

    Your news story 'Agencies cash in on working time limit' (page 2, 22 October) misleads by using the wrong terminology. The split is not between full-time and part-time workers but between workers who are NHS employees and those who are agency employees.
  • Anticipating the assembly

    How will the national assembly influence healthcare in Wales? The NHS Confederation in Wales' annual conference wanted answers to some basic questions, writes Lyn Whitfield
  • Community trusts are part of the solution for primary care in London

    I congratulate Richard Lewis and the London Initiative Zone review steering group on compiling a clear and informative report on the complex LIZ programme ('LIZ: a legacy for London', pages 24-27, 1 October). The review helps redress an apparent cooling of commitment and interest by the centre towards the end of the programme.
  • Crackdown on NHS sickness bill begins

    NHS human resources managers are to have new guidance on tackling absenteeism in line with chancellor Gordon Brown's bid to cut £6bn from the public sector staff sickness bill.
  • Diplomatic mission for man with the power to persuade Mental health policy critics are not distracted by a change of minister

    comment
  • Distinct improvement

    The Advisory Committee on Distinction Awards is to lose its in-built medical majority, although some doubt this goes far enough to justify the system, reports Mark Crail
  • DoH promises £375m for child mental health

    Children's mental health services are to be earmarked for extra cash in the government's forthcoming mental health strategy, Department of Health officials confirmed last week.
  • Fatal accident inquiries ordered

    The Lord Advocate has ordered fatal accident inquiries into the deaths of two teenagers who were treated at Glasgow Victoria Infirmary.
  • heading to come

    We've got the picture now, thanks to a flood of reports from or about the government: children need looking after better than we've managed lately. Yet we're still in a terrible muddle. Like those harrowing photos we always see in Armistice Week, the victims often end up in hospital, jail or dead.
  • Hit or myth

    It is a myth that managers motivate their staff. Surely, says Robert Keys, it's the other way round
  • in brief

    The Legal Aid Board has agreed, with immediate effect, that it can and will pay for mediation if a case backed by legal aid can be resolved that way. It had initially argued that, by law, its funding covered only traditional dispute resolution - by negotiation or litigation. Mediation could be cheaper in many cases.
  • Knowing who's boss

    Is hierarchy the natural order for organisations or can a looser structure be just as effective? Andrew Wall examines the options
  • Lawyers at large

    The legal and ethical aspects of telemedicine By BA Stanberry Royal Society of Medicine Press 172 pages £19.99
  • Mental health cash to target child services

    Children's mental health services are to be earmarked for extra cash in the government's forthcoming mental health strategy, Department of Health officials confirmed last week.
  • Ministers and civil servants are using 'pressure and dogma' to co-erce primary care groups towards independent trust status, GPs have warned.

    Ministers and civil servants are using 'pressure and dogma' to co-erce primary care groups towards independent trust status, GPs have warned.
  • monitor

    A health authority chief executive who probably wishes to remain nameless reveals the latest government thinking on a new system of patient- centred PCGs. 'The core of the new system will be the establishment of patient consultative groups,' according to a secret document he has helpfully sent to Monitor. Every patient in the country will be part of a geographically based PCG, each averaging 500 patients. PCGs will have a management board of 11, including an elected chair, who will be the exe
  • New family policy has 'enormous' implications for NHS with major extension of health visitors' role

    The government's controversial Supporting Families green paper, launched last week, looks set to have major implications for the health service.
  • 'No win no fee' stakes raised

    The ink had hardly dried on judgments in three House of Lords cases which will increase damages awards by up to one-third in big negligence cases, when the Lord Chancellor decided on another reform which will mean higher legal costs for the NHS.
  • Pluralist approach to the promotion race

    Evaluating health promotion Edited by Scott and Weston Stanley Thornes 168 pages £18
  • Pro-family policy has 'enormous' implications for NHS with major extension of health visitors' role

    The government's controversial Supporting Families green paper, launched last week, looks set to have major implications for the health service.
  • Professionals with a purpose

    'Lengths of stay and waiting lists are ideal measurements, easy to count and to change; kindness and caring are virtually impossible to identify or to measure, so they have largely disappeared from the NHS lexicon'
  • Reverse charges

    No one knows what effect primary care groups will have on prescribing costs. But Frances Wilson explains how one health authority reversed a drugs overspend
  • Rights Act will impact on resource allocation

    legal briefing
  • Settling in

    The NHS is being urged both to improve access to healthcare for refugees and to integrate more refugee doctors into the service. Barbara Millar reports
  • Short cuts Although most motorcyclists underestimate the risks of an accident

    Although most motorcyclists underestimate the risks of an accident, younger inexperienced riders see themselves at more risk, accordiing to a report in the British Journal of Psychology. Death or injury to a friend or relative increased their perception of risk.
  • Short cuts Community nurses

    Community nurses can reach socially excluded people which other health services can't, according to Rabbi Julia Neuberger. 'They can provide quality health care to homeless people, travelling families and refugees - many of whom have little contact with mainstream health services until they become dangerously unwell,' she told a joint conference organised by the King's Fund and Queen's Nursing Institute.
  • Short cuts Community nurses can reach socially excluded

    Community nurses can reach socially excluded people who can't be reached by other health services, according to King's Fund chief executive Rabbi Julia Neuberger. 'They can provide quality healthcare to homeless people, travelling families and refugees - many of whom have little contact with mainstream health services until they become dangerously unwell,' she told a conference organised jointly by the King's Fund and the Queen's Nursing Institute.
  • Short cuts Coventry HA boosts health promotion pharmacists

    Coventry health authority has launched a public awareness campaign on the health promotion role of community pharmacists. It will encourage the public to seek advice from pharmacists on a wide range of issues, including medicines, minor ailments, healthy eating, sexual health, physical activity and giving up smoking. The HA points out that appointments are not necessary to seek help from pharmacists.
  • Short cuts Coventry health authority

    Coventry health authority has launched a public awareness campaign on the health promotion role of community pharmacists. The campaign will encourage people to seek advice from pharmacists on a wide range of issues including medicines, minor ailments, healthy eating, sexual healthy, physical activity and giving up smoking. The HA points out that people do not need appointments to seek help from pharmacists.
  • Short cuts Edinburgh Healthcare

    Edinburgh Healthcare NHS Trust is investing £1 million in setting up a 16 bed nursing home, in the grounds of Corstorphine hospital and run and staffed by the NHS, to provide accommodation for people with learning disabilities who are moving out of Gogarurn hospital, which is due to close in March 1999.
  • Short cuts Five million people suffer back pain

    Five million people suffer back pain in the UK, costing the NHS £193m a year to treat, members of theEuropean Parliament heard at a launch by the European Federation of Pain Societies last week. The Federation has drawn up guidelines for effective pain management and wants more statistics on chronic pain in Europe.
  • Short cuts Food safety report recommends better surveillance

    Improved surveillance and reporting of food-borne viral infection, and good hygiene practice, are recommended in a report from the Department of Health and Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food.
  • Short cuts Hutchinson takes chair of fatigue syndrome group

    Professor Allen Hutchinson, director of public health at Sheffield University's school of health, is to chair the government's working group on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which was announced in July. It will produce advice on clinical management of the illness. There will also be a sub-group on children.
  • Short cuts Improved surveillance

    Improved surveillance and reporting of foodborne viral infection, along with good hygiene practice, are called for in a report from the Departments of Health and Agriculture. Report by the Advisory Committee on Microbiolical Safety of Food, £17.50, Stationery Office.
  • Short cuts Long-term conditions group wins £170,000 grant

    The Long-term Medical Conditions Alliance has been awarded nearly £170,000 by the national lottery to support development work with member organisations, one third of whom rely on volunteers and trustees to keep running. The grant is for three years.
  • Short cuts Nursing home set up to replace long-stay hospital

    Edinburgh Healthcare trust is investing £1m in setting up a 16-bed nursing home in the grounds of Corstorphine Hospital. It will be run and staffed by the NHS and will provide accommodation for people with learning disabilities who are moving out of Gogarburn Hospital, which is due to close in March 1999.
  • Short cuts Pain federation highlights £193m back problems

    Five million people suffer back pain in the UK, costing the NHS £193m a year to treat, members of the European Parliament heard at a launch by the European Federation of Pain Societies last week. The federation has drawn up guidelines for effective pain management and wants more statistics on chronic pain in Europe.
  • Short cuts Patients at a Scottish hospital

    Patients at a Scottish hospital have been asked to bring in their own quilts and duvets during their stay after management admitted running out of bed linen. Staff at Hairmyres Hospital in East Kilbride had to phone patients who were about to be admitted and ask them if they could supply their own bedding after a delivery had failed to turn up.
  • Short cuts Patients bring in duvets as hospital bedding runs out

    Stand clear: heart surgeon Francis Wells at work, pictured in one of a series of photographs taken during a single week. The pictures form one of three exhibitions linking art and medicine on show at Buckingham- shire Art Gallery until 6 December. Paintings depicting stages of breast cancer and work by long-term hospitalised children are also on show.
  • Short cuts Professor Allen Hutchinson

    Professor Allen Hutchinson, director of public health at Sheffield University's school of health, is to chair the government's working group on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which was announced in July. It will produce advice on clinical management of the illness. There will also be a sub- group on children.
  • Short cuts The Long-term Medical Conditions Alliance

    The Long-term Medical Conditions Alliance has been awarded nearly £170,000 by the national lottery to support development work with member organisations, one third of whom rely on volunteers and trustees to keep running. The grant is for three years.
  • Short cuts Trainee respiratory staff

    Trainee respiratory staff are being offered bursaries of £750 towards the cost of attending next year's European Respiratory Society conference in Madrid, or the American Thoracic Society conference in California. Details from Sheila Edwards, chief executive, British Thoracic Society, 6th floor, North Wing, New Garden House, 78 Hatton Garden, London EC1N 8JR.
  • Short cuts Travel bursary launched for trainee respiratory staff

    Trainee respiratory staff are being offered bursaries of £750 towards the cost of attending next year's European Respiratory Society conference in Madrid, or the American Thoracic Society conference in California. Details from Sheila Edwards, chief executive, British Thoracic Society, 6th floor, North Wing, New Garden House, 78 Hatton Garden, London EC1N 8JR.
  • SNP: great intenders will produce policy, but after consultation

    In her report on the Scottish National Party's People's assembly on health (News Focus, page 16, 15 October), headed 'SNP: still no policies', Barbara Millar lists SNP plans to establish an all-party Scottish healthcare commission including outsiders with expertise among its ranks, a democratic input into health boards and local healthcare co-operatives, a public health portfolio and a transparent national framework for the transfer of resources between health and social services.
  • Straw's soundbites on psychiatry don't distinguish the 'mad' from the 'bad'

    Home secretary Jack Straw's pronouncements on the psychiatric profession should not be allowed to pass without significant public comment and debate.
  • Tailoring expected in guidance on working time for NHS managers

    The NHS Executive is expected to recommend that all health service managers should be covered by the European working time directive, on which an advance letter is due next Thursday.
  • Take it from the top: Janet Snell gathers a range of views from health managers

    Philip Sands, director of corporate strategy, Calderdale and Kirklees health authority
  • The assembly and the NHS in Wales.

    The assembly will:
  • The government's response to Utting: main points

    All children entering care to be offered a health assessment.
  • The human cost of PFI

    That unions have won rights to screen private finance initiative bidders' employment records is to be applauded, but what of patients?
  • The talking cure for poor performance

    Counselling for managers By Nigel MacLennan Gower 296 pages £24.99
  • The third man

    John Hutton is the third member of a now influential political triumvirate. Patrick Butler reports on the new junior health minister's rise to power
  • Theatre people

    Cutting waiting lists depends on high levels of overtime by operating theatre staff, but this is no long-term solution to persistent shortages. Jonathan Edgar and colleagues report on a survey
  • Tribunal rules that mental illness 'is a disability' under 1995 act

    A mental illness is a disability under the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, the employment appeal tribunal has held in a landmark decision (News, page 5, 29 October).
  • Wales' waste of wisdom Election rules mean assembly forgoes much NHS expertise

    Devolution offers the people of Wales an unrivalled opportunity to reshape their health service. But if the standard of debate among politicians at the NHS Confederation in Wales' annual conference last week is a foretaste of what can be expected once the Welsh assembly is up and running, there is little cause for optimism (See News Focus, page 14).
  • WEB WATCH

    Does anti-tobacco propaganda work? Difficult to tell - though according to official statistics, among non-smokers almost half the men and more than a third of the women used to smoke, which may tell us something.
  • where are they now?

    No 90
  • WHO study vindicates smokers - so can we be accommodated now?

    The findings of the World Health Organisation's research into the alleged risk to non-smokers of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, recently published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, confirm what a wide range of reputable individuals and organisations have long maintained: that it in no way constitutes the threat that the anti-smoker industry would have us all believe.

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